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Do you remember Kuwait? October 26, 2011

Posted by hslu in Do you know?, Global Affair, Oil.
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It has been 20 years since Kuwait was thrusted into the limelight in a way unimaginable.

Yes, it’s been that long when 750 Kuwaiti oil wells were set on fire when Saddam Hussein pulled his troops out of this tiny country south of Iraq.

Here is the damage done by this heinous act:

• The fire burned for eight months.
•. About 5.5 million barrels of oil was consumed every day.
•. About 3 Billion cubic feet of natural gas was burned every day.
• More than 300 oil lakes were formed from oil that wasn’t burned containing 22.5 million barrels of oil.
•. More than 10 million barrels of oil flowed into Persian Gulf.
•. More than 10,000 oil field workers from 37 countries participated in the effort to minimize the damage.
•. Well control cost well over $1.5 billion or about $2 million per well.
•. The total price tag came to $5 billion.
•. The oil industry met the daunting task and kill about 100 well each month.
•. The first fire was spotted in late February, 1991. The last fire was put out on November 6, 1991.
•. The most ingenious way to put out fire was devised by Hungarian fire fighting team: a MIG-21 turbine was mounted on old Soviet T-62 tanks. High pressure water and air were directed at the burning well which eventually distinguished the fire.
•. Did the oil industry receive any thanks from the politicians? I don’t think so because they didn’t know how difficult it was to begin with.

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